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syria. this interview recorded on the campus of george mason university in virginia. lasts about half an hour. .. there are there are. .. >> it went through a number of changes. it went from a centralized state of economy to a mixed economy that evolves from central state economy aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> when did this change occur from centralized next? >> most of these countries, the late developed countries, they underwent a period where they had to actually involve the masses in order to gain support. and legitimacy. when this process, for a variety of reasons began to create problems for the regimes in power, and when external support and pressure for some of these regimes and for some of the directions that were unable at the time moving towards a market economy around the 1980s took place, you saw a lot of these third world regimes, or the global south, begin to move from a central economy to more market oriented economy and the international financial institutions like the imf and the
, marcusreddeker.com. >>> from the 17th annual texas book festival in successen, texas, we discuss the book "syria: the fall of the house oo assad." >> thank you so much foruch for spending part of your afternoony with us here.s i would like to welcome you alle on behalf of the professor and myself. this is afessor l wesonderful s. i'm saying that dispassionately, and we're so happy you're here.r i wanted to introduce the profe professor to you. he is asch to professor of middt history at trinity university it san antonio. professor lesch is a prolific writer writer and thinker about the the middle east and what's happening in the region. it's really a treat tosy a havem here today.he h w he's written his new book n b "syria: the fall of the house ou assad" which i'm hoping you'll m all purchase and get him toill sign. he signed my copy first so he f. has met extensively with met president assad and officials lg between 2004-2011, been in the middle east, studying the middle st east, making connections andeast friendships in the middle east for a quar ater century. the r why that's important is, o
, a discussion about the ongoing civil war in syria. that hearing a military conflict. then a panel on housing assistance to low-income renters. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", a look at whether medicare and social security should be part of negotiations on fiscal cliff. we will talk with john larson on how house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate represe
, secretary panetta, since president obama made a statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did, we understand the red line, but the world this week certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this, how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to s
to state conflict, a conflict between israel and jordan, israel and syria and israel and egypt. this became a new conflict that emerged, one between israel and the palestinians. before 1967, you really didn't hear about the palestinians. it's not by accident a year after the war ended in 1968, the p.l.o., under yasser arafat, emerges as this powerful force in the arab world. we have been living with that as well. 1967 war was also inaugurated the strategic relationship between the united states and israel. people forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have
resolution is the best resolution in syria. >> any indication that assad got the president's message yesterday and took it to heart? [inaudible] >> obviously, have not had a direct conversation -- >> right -- >> it would be hard to imagine they are not fully aware of the seriousness of the president's position on this, the seriousness with which we would take the prospect of the use of chemical weapons and, you know, i think that message was delivered clearly by the president, by others in the administration, and others around the world. we continue to say that if the assad regime makes the mistake of using chemical weapons or fails to meet obligations to secure chemical weapons, there will be consequences, and the regime will be held accountable. >> [inaudible] you said a loophole there. they have to use the weapons first before we do anything? preparations to say it's not enough? >> i'll repeat what i said, connie. if the assad regime makes the mistake of using chemical weapons or fails to meet the obligations to secure them, there's consequences, and the regime is accountable. the
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
are speaking only about foreign policy and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i do want to thank those who made this possible and as chairman of the key subcommittee i value the work that you do, each of you do on a range of policies, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, syria which i will focus on but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress and i am grateful for that help. i know that the theme of this year's forum is, quote, dictators and dissidents:should the west choose sides? quite topical given the events that have played out most recently whether it is the arabs spring, or nascent democratic openings, i would argue the central question maybe is one of process. that question being whether the u.s. the west should support the democratic process such that citizens are able to choose their own leaders. even when the process gives rise to politic
to syria is like coming up from liberal humanists because we tend to say all dictators are bad, all democrats are good, you know, we eliminate and eraser distinctions and it's the distinctions that give the complexity we need to understand the world, and yet they ran a brutal dictatorship that was nothing like saddam hussein. and i had my passport taken away for ten days while the iraqi authorities when i was in kurdistan that time i was very near dayton nervous it i got back from the airport before i left and i was a journalist that got too close to my story and i was intent on eliminating saddam hussein. i believe like a lot of people in different western countries in the world and on both sides of the aisle that there was wmd. but more importantly, i believe the regime is suffocating and brutal and you couldn't trust it. you have to assume that it existed. the war turned out. i'm not a fatalist what we had a different strategies it could have been different. we cannot say that it wouldn't matter no matter what we did put on the other hand, a lot of the mistakes we made were impli
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
civil war in syria. the hearing on the military conflict in eastern congo. later, a discussion about the middle east security. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognize the main syrian opposition groups as the legitimate representative of this country's people. earlier today political adviser to the syrian american council and a turkish journalist reporting on this serious civil war at the new america foundation. both men recently returned from the country and say the west can do more to help the syrian people. >> welcome, everyone. wellcome also to know c-span and its audience. very excited about today's events because we have two people with those who have recently come from syria and are able to give us an insider perspective, something that is hard to come by in the context of syria. to my far right is mohammed ghanem. he received his bachelor's degree in english literature as well as his graduate degree in translation from damascus university. he went on to aaron a master's degree in peace building in conflict transformation from the center of justice and peace
upon so soon, but, you know, at the time, syria was looking, you know, as the sequential arab revolts came into being, there was very few places where the united states had an easy or even a conceivable influence -- edge to come in and do something where the consequences were not dramatic. they were at least, you know, there could be a pos five, you know, of course, egypt, a long-time ally anchor in the middle east, supportive of israel, and tunisia was a little bit, but, by that point, already crossed the threshold and ali was out, and syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, very different. it's a multisectarian society with lots and lots of, you know, connections to other powers into which are iran, lebanon, israel, you know, where disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. libya presented a -- was unique that that the libyans -- there was a popular uprising, there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward instead of on the first unofficial, then increasingly of
of syria eventually. so we have to be very careful. be part of the settlement, with a gap between what people think about the settlement out of court and the jury-ish community and about the reality. maybe you can tell me, do you know what is the actual percentage of settlement of jewish homes occupying land in judea and samaria? sound settlement, what is actual on the ground that she had occupied the lands? anyone? >> is 3%. i wish it was 50, 90 or 100%. but it's not the case. it is vacant. the idea that the jews cannot leave, because we do not have peace i do not accept it. to date israel with arab israelis, 20% in the week. they live like i live, vote like i vote and nobody tell them if you've not lived there, you have to move out. we have to get to the understanding that it's not about the settlement. it's much deeper than that. [inaudible] >> that is the question? i am 41, ma'am. i do not -- and said what you want. did you get peace? what did it get? [inaudible] >> i think my point is very clear that history has told us we cannot wait and we cannot get to a point when people speak
be happening in terms of russian policy toward syria. since we mentioned iran can we get as far away as syria? >> you can get as far away as syria with some connections. >> if not -- [talking over each other] >> the question of syriac is totally sufficient importance that we could address that. my own gut feeling, i don't know what you feel, the russians have been for the last several weeks there have been indications of unhappiness with what is going on in syria without a clear sense of what it is they can contribute and whether they could do it on their own or with the u.s. the u.s. has always wanted the russians to be part of that kind of solution. if there's one at all. if the russians in any way are moving toward the american position with respect to syria that are all afforded. another question. >> there's one right here. and we will assume that is the last question. >> you all hinted and alluded, i wonder about the dimension towards inf negotiations. >> public diplomacy. >> the diplomacy, not with respect to the allies, very carefully stated different allies, practice meeting by meetin
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
. another example is syria. there al qaeda in iraq seeks to establish a long-term dream. by fighting alongside the syrian opposition groups the members are working to hijack the longer struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated on the front of the ail yes, sir of aca i which is already listed as a foreign terrorist terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimate sei of the we called it a warning to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help the terrorist group. to add to the list of new challenges, in west africa the loosely organized of collection of factions who have some ties to -- public sympathy. the number in sophistication to the attacks increasing and while the group focusing principally on local nigeria issues -- iranian revolutionary guard and teheran's ally hezbollah. in addition to the critical support that hezbollah are providing for serious assad regime, over the past year, there's been a significant escalation in iranian-backed terrorism. hezbollah's activity has reached an tempo unseen since the 1990s wit
you. saturday night at 10:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2 p. >>> leon panetta on the syria government response against the rebel. the remarking game at the joint briefing with the veteran affair secretary eric shinseki on efforts to assist military personnel reentering life. if no agreement is reached on the fiscal cliff. this twenty five minute event took police at the veteran affair offices in washington, d.c. >>> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for the unwavering support for the here at the va and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniform of the nation. our close partnership with the immediating we had -- meeting we had today on their behalf has never been more important as it is today. as we enter the holiday season i want to thank the men and whoim spend their holiday away from the families defending the nation. we're grateful for their the service and sacrifice. as we have discussed very little what we do here at va -- most of what we work on originated in dodd and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires the close and collaborative w
to the turkish border. a stark warning to the syria's president bush are al-assad to cease the air strikes and fighting against the rebels that have played into the turkish territory. we can't spend a lot of time worrying about whether that secretary panetta said dr. words. but in an interview with esquire, he said that he invited kim jong il over for dinner and he cooked for him, served him a glass of moreni and tried to understand how he thinks. clearly that all the loving secretary of defense is a complex man. his list of accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education and even a little bit of labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense on july 4th, 2011, secretary panetta served more than two years as the cia director. after three years as the chief of staff to president clinton, secretary leon panetta and his wife could directed the leon and sylvia panetta institute for public police at california state university at monterey bay a nonpartisan center to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress rising in
with his younger brother forming what becomes the people's liberation army, travels through syria and other countries, and then he decides to go to kabul, where the soviet union has recently arrived, and it is there that you are born, 1982. >> uh-huh. >> so there's a -- i marked a little page here where your father writes to someone about his revolutionary arian rhode island. >> yes. >> we the pla are unique in many respects, official spokesman is a dog, wolf, and we have more commanders than fighters, first organization of pakistan's history that believes in fighting. we consider secrecy nothing to be secret about, and pla can make secrets more than friends, no one know exactly who is the chief. the official spokesman has ticks and likes to chew on borns. the official spokesman, well, undisciplined in personal habits. >> yes. >> so was that a true reflection of the character of his revolutionary activity? >> i think it was a reflection of the fact when they made the choice to confront the regime directly and militarily, they were 25 and 21 years old. they had, for two years, sacrificed the
the iranians the opportunity to divert to talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria. so the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue of our principle concern, meaning proliferation. that's one school of thought. the second school of thought is if the agenda is broader you can have agreement on some issues. that has never been resolved, and when the issue remains unresolved the status quo remains. should it be considered as a last ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about years of decision, the year of this or that. we have more time on this issue. we always think of it as not having enough time, yet somehow there's always more time. somehow his issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how else to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions, and i suggest if there's a bilateral conversation,. >> marina, i thought i'd bring you in on this. ray said we need have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i'd be interested to hear your opinion on that and what you hope for from president obama and the united states in ter
better, but by that point it had crossed the threshold. syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, it's very different. it's multi sectarian society with lots and lots of connections to other plot powers . lebanon, israel, disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. so libya presented -- was unique in that the libyans have a popular uprising. there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward as sort of first unofficial but increasingly official spokesman of the libyan people. this was an opportunity for essentially president obama and the united states that makes some good on much of the content of the 2009 speech which is very important. i think people are potentially losing sight of that. the second take away is the question of intelligence and what we have known about what is going on in libya for the past 42 years and is remarkably little. you know, this is, i think also a symptom of a particular country that goes into it sanctions, blackouts because once camino, that
may be happening in terms of the russian policy toward syria? since we have mentioned iran can we get as far away as syria? >> you can get as far away as syria i hope with some connection. i do appreciate that but the question of syria is of totally sufficient importance so we could address that and thank you for the question. my own gut feeling and i don't know how you guys feel, but the russians have been for the last several weeks, there have been indications of unhappiness with what is going on in syria without a clear sense of what it is that they can can shape it and whether they can do it on their own or with the u.s.. the u.s. has always wanted the russians to be part of that kind of a solution. if there could be one at all. so, if the russians in any way are moving toward the american decision with respect to syria, i think we are all better off for it. okay, another question out there? there is one right up here. and then we will assume that is the last question. >> i wonder if, you all alluded to it and i wonder if we could call the diplomacy -- moving towards the inf negot
intelligence officials have a large-scale terror plots in october and into syria, where the reports yesterday of chemical weapons being moved. i'm increasingly worried the terrorists may have programs by turkey, jordan or other countries where persons may fully to escape the bloodshed. it is imperative the interagency security screening process for all refugees be formidable incredible. the purpose of this hearing is to identify any remaining gaps in the security screening process they need to be remedied in to ensure that dhs and the state department had the necessary tools and resources at their disposal to deal to carry out the necessary security checks. it is concerning to me that either of the iraqi refugees arrested last year had worked for any u.s. military diplomatic or nongovernmental organization in iraq. get both receive refugee status based on humanitarian reasons. all this being said, i am glad that the agency security screening and adjudication process for refugees has undergone and continues to undergo a number of enhancements since it was initiated. in particular that's a call
indonesia and what rights does an american jew, gay or woman in chile and syria? what obligations we have to the french nation to suggest we are citizens of the world destroys our understanding of the term and weakens us at the performance of the duties of the citizen. one might say that the american power was the 1969 moon landing, and since then, we'll be successful the empire in history according to the greatest access to prosperity, happiness and public life and history have been on the decline. this decline has given as inevitable. nothing lasts forever. this period of diminishing american hegemony, however, may be one of calfee age. we are the owners of the country and its board of directors, and we may find the strength to reasonably consider the options open to us in this confusing time, none of them is perfect. and this is a time we must make a moral choice which is to say a choice between the two flawed or bad alternatives. if we do not choose, the choice will be made for us by those uninterested at home and abroad by weakening the power of the american electorate. it's not a br
northeast asia and the middle east. the conflict in syria is bringing a violent end to a regime that harbors a large stockpile of chemical and biological weapons, and extremists seek to destabilize a nuclear-armed pakistan. increasing military or spending -- military spending by rising powers in the asia pacific region and turmoil across the middle east and north africa are altering the strategic landscape. at the same time, the nature of military conflict is changing because of the new technologies like cyber and the proliferation of missiles and wmd. we are seeing potential adversaries, state and nonstate actors alike, acquire more advanced hybrid and high-end capabilities designed to frustrate the conventional advantages of our armed forces. this means that the military services must remain vigilant, they must remain strong, they must remain prepared to operate in a way that differs significantly from the past. we will continue to face terrorism and deadly attacks by ieds. but we must also be ready for more capable adversaries to a attack our forces and our homeland in cyberspace. to atta
actively with syria's neighbors, our friends in the international community to } our common concerns about the security of these weapons and the syrian government to. >> we believe that they are part of the saudi regime. the regime has lost all legitimacy to lead syria and we are concerned about the chemical weapons stockpile, which have increased. >> is the type of movement that we are seeing right seeing right now, and as i crossed the red line? >> i think the president makes clear that the use of weapons was a red line. we are monitoring the situation closely and monitoring the regime and the chemical weapons stockpile. i am not going to get into intelligence matters, but the regime's grip on power is losing with putting down the opposition with conventional means. we have an increased concern about the possibility of the regime taking the desperate act of using chemical weapons. >> that you cannot say that what we are seeing right now does not cross the red line? >> again, i think we are talking about the use of chemical weapons. >> i think you are hearing from me about our increased c
warning to syria's president bashar al-assad to cease the airstrikes and fighting against syrian rebels that have bled into turkish territory. we can't spend a lot of time worrying about whether -- secretary panetta said afterwards. yet an interview with esquire, he said if he invited kim jong-un over for dinner he would serve him a glass of wine and try to understand how the guy things. clearly the piano playing dog loving secretary of defense is a complex man. his list of accomplishments over 74 years spans two branches of government, education and even a little bit of foreign labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense on july 4, 2011, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years as chief of staff to president clinton, secretary panetta and his wife sylvia codirected the leon and sylvia panetta institute for public poli-sci california state university at monterey bay, nonpartisan senator -- center to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress, rising in 1989 to chairman of the house budget co
in september. the late anthony shadid has been nominated. he died in syria while covering syria for the washington post. his wife will be here representing him, and that's nada bachary. katherine boo has been nominated, "behind the beautiful forever," about mumbai, and anne applebaum has a book out and is scheduled on our q & a show in september. so we'll be interviewing those authors as we go. we'll be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their picture taken. right now we want to talk to the chairman of the national book foundation, and this is david steinberger. mr. steinbergers is also head of the become group what is the national book airport. >> given to the best american books in four categories, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people's literature, and you look at the people who have won this award, it's the pan of pantheons. saul bell wyoming. >> this began 63 years ago. do you know the history, why it began? >> it was group of people who were interested in making sure that great books had the greatest possible impact on the culture, and that's
the civil war in syria. he grew up in oklahoma, of all places, an american-lebanese family. he ended up fascinated by the middle east, became a reporter, and the life mission was to try to explain this region to americans, which is no easy thing to do. he covered his -- more than his share of wars issue and in the course of that, sort of his first marriage fell apart because he was always overseas covering the war. he ends up buying his family's old ramshackled house somewhere in lebanon. i forget the name of the village, and takes a year off to restore the house. it sounds like a movie, almost, which he does with great difficulty. the book, his memoir, blends in both lebanese history, and it's glorious past, which is sadly been destroyed through civil war, as well as his own personal story so we sort of -- it was -- shortly before the book came out, he died. he was no more than 40 or 45. >> host: sarah weinman? >> guest: well, i feel like in looking at this list, i feel an unmitigated surge to talk about how much i adored the katherine book and i made a joke on twitter that if her book
as the people of our brand or syria or cuba do. but the freedom collection to wish it dissidents and freedom advocates the way. we for young minds of education programs. were helping to build the free institutions of the middle east with women's fellowship since it will help wounded warriors and other veterans and their families through military service initiative. today is the president said this about economic freedom, which is the surest route to growth. as president bush wrote in his forward to 4% solution, free-market capitalism offers the most efficient and just way to order an economy. such a system allows individuals to decide the course of their alliance. this book does not exist in a vacuum. side of the 4% growth product had eight in nitish lays. the product began at smu in the spring of 2011. i know many of you were there. the hard top economists and started a website. we held a second conference on tax policy in may in new york and we have an event scheduled in september in chicago that will feature governor mitch daniels. like the project as a whole, this book seeks americans as
in syria. his book is a memoir. he grew up in oklahoma full places, and american lebanese family. became a reporter and his life mission was to try to explain, which is no easy thing to do. he covered more than an issue for in the course of the first marriage and death buying the family's old ramshackle house somewhere in lebanon. i forget the name of the village and takes a year off to restore the movie almost, which he does with great difficulty. the book, his memoir blends in both lebanese history and its glorious past, which is sadly destroyed or civil war as voices of personal story. so shortly before the book came out, he died. he missed about 40, 45. >> host: sarah weinman. >> guest: well, i feel looking at this list, and unmitigated searcher talk about how much i adore the book. i made a comment on twitter just kathryn booze did every single best of 2012 book it would be fine with me. it's a phenomenal piece of report it, but literature which he writes with a tremendous sense of empathy. she's a new yorker staff writer and previous recipient of the macarthur genius grant. her hus
of apparently related to an asthma attack while covering the war in syria. his book is a memoir, he grew up in oklahoma of all places, an american lebanese family, ended up fascinated by the middle east, became a reporter, his life mission was to try to explain this region to america which is no easy thing to do. he covered more than his share of wars and in the course of that, his first marriage fell apart because he was always overseas covering the war. the ends up buying his family's old ramshackle house somewhere in lebanon and takes a year off to restore the house. sounds like a movie almost which he does with great difficulty. his memoir blends in both lebanese history and its glorious past which was sadly destroyed through civil war as well as starting. shortly before the book came out he died. she must have been 40 or so, 45. >> sarah weinman. >> i feel like in looking at this list i feel unmitigated surge to talk about how i enjoy it the capt. book, if catherine booth's book made every best of 2012 list that would be fine by me. it is a phenomenal piece not only of reporting but li
went to syria now they get it from both sides. the state and whenever the rebellion is. we have that in the wake of being expelled. i met an old man who had to flee in 1970 with his wife and said christians did not see the writing on the wall and they should have. the same with egypt. now there is a terrible risk. a huge and christian population. the rich are leaving that they can afford a lawyer or the airplane ticket but what is left are the poor. where will they go on foot? sudan, libya and israel by a are putting up another wall. so they cannot go there either. it is an massive refugee problem waiting to happen in. a pattern repeating itself over and over. i know how to sound the alarm with what is coming with refugees. it will be a nightmare. we just finished with the manuscript. it is not a survey but an analysis of the authorities that persecute christians. there are so many we had to add an additional section in the book to cover it. it is a huge problem. the countries that have been expelled by the most obvious because the same thing happens to the christians now. and t
are seeing them play a more active and positive role in international diplomacy. in syria we have work to do. you see where we are headed with respect to styria based on secretary clinton's recent comments but china is strategic, china has strong interest in managing its ascension as a global power, not the only rising power in the neighborhood. it is something that we share. we believe both we, the united states, and the community of democracies have the ability to strategically put that together and do it based on the first two principles and partnerships. >> we just don't have a large advertising campaign. i just want to comment on china's syria plan. it has nothing to do with syria which is quite a separate issue. it has everything to do with wounding a america. this -- china and russia have got together and overtures were sent to delhi to send some sort of needlework if you want to use that word and india thankfully has resisted and keeps its options more nuanced and flexible. china's natural game, dr. kissinger has three chapters in his book. the interesting thing about that game is it
, concerned about egypt, concerned about syria. we are concerned about azerbaijan, armenia, and georgia, and the gulf states, especially bahrain right now. so i will end up by just saying that this is going to be probably my last hearing as chairman of this committee. my good friend, greg, and msha my other colleagues will do everything they can to make sure we continue to pursue this issue to make sure that not only the region is secure but our interests, united states of america's interests are safe as we'll. without i yield to my colleague, mr. meeks. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i want to thank you for holding as you said this most important hearing. but i also want to say to a degree sad, that because this probably will be your last hearing here in the united states house of representatives after almost three decades of service to our country, and we want to salute you for that. some, you know, maybe with regret not having used to stick around anymore. but we indeed are going to miss you, and i have to say that it's been an honor and a personal privilege for me to sit as a ranki
. is it possible some day may be happening in terms of russian policy toward syria? as we mentioned iran, to make it as far away syria? >> you can get a faraway scenery with some connection to imf. >> i do appreciate that. the question of syria isn't totally sufficient importance that we could address that. thank you for the question. i have that feeling, i don't know what you guys need here, but the russians have been, for the last several weeks, there have been indications of unhappiness with what is going on in serious without a clear sense of what it is they can contribute them whether they can do it on their own or with the u.s. the u.s. is always one of the russians to be part of that kind of a solution if there be one at all. so if the russians in any way all. so if the russians in any way are moving towards the american position with respect area, i think we are all better off for it. [inaudible] >> another question here. >> good. there's one right appear. i will assume that's the last question. very much. >> you you-all hinted undiluted. i wonder if you recall the diplomacy mentioned of
, and some of them in the foreign policy area are very relevant today. for instance, over syria. we understand that. we hope that at recent events, syria may be moving russia and the united states closer in terms of our thinking. but it is only a good thing to bring russia into a rules-based system with mechanisms for peaceful, transparent dispute resolution. there is no debate. and i think the chair knows this full well, that the very tragic and senseless death of anticorruption lawyer sergei magnitsky who died while in russian custody, that those events are simply unacceptable. they're appalling. and it highlights a human rights problem that has grown in its scope, not diminished. it's one we hope to be able to resolve with good relationships and good discussions. senator cardin, a sponsor of that legislation, in the house of the senate is going to speak shortly about it, and i will leave him to describe in full the nature of that particular component of this bill. suffice it to say, that human rights -- democracy and transparency activists in russia favor the passage of construct
the slaughter in syria. just as we nurture the democratic transitions after communism fell essential in eastern europe, we can support the forces of freedom in the middle east today. and just as we were able to prevail in the long struggle against the soviet union during the cold war, we can prevail in the global conflict with islamic extremism and terrorism that we were forced into by the terrorist attacks of september 11, 2001. but all that too will require leadership in the united states senate. it will require bidders who will stand against the siren song of isolationism, who will defend our defense and foreign assistance budget, who will support, when necessary, the use of america's military power against our enemies in the world and who will have the patience and determination when the public is weary ccr battles through until they are one. mr. president, first definition are almost 50 years ago in the summer of 1963 comments by a thick so many may generation by president john f. kennedy and his call to service. i spent that summer break here in the senate as an intern or my home state se
and you will have situations where radical extremist groups can hijack egypt or libya or syria or elsewhere were you don't have a strong push back which is what i'm suggesting we and our allies in the west need to help provide , support to these brave liberals and moderates in the muslim world who do want to push back but just need the tools to be able to do so. >> try and answer to that question. died and liberty. i think it goes to of the idea that in the concept of god that we have and the judeo-christian approach, there is a sole that each individual has a soul. and that means that each individual is an individual. there are no two alike. and that is the basis for quality. because that means no matter how strong you are, how bright you are, how rich you are, it doesn't matter. you have a soul. i have a soul. we are equal in that sense. that is the case than you have to have liberty because the individual, there is nothing like that individual's own decision to move the decision maker. that gets into the economics of things that we talk about in the public forum. so that is
an american jew, gay or a woman, enjoy in syria? to suggest we're citizens of the world destroys our understanding of the term and so weakens our performance of the duties of a citizen. one might say that the ap to gee of american power was the 1969 moon landing, and since then we have been in a decline. this decline is inevitable, nothing lasts forever. this period of diminishing american he generalny, however, may be one of healthy age. we citizens are the owners of of this country and its board of directors, and we may find the strength to reasonably consider the options open to us in this confusing time. one of them is perfect. and this is a sign we must make a moral choice which is to say a choice between two flawed or, indeed, bad alternatives. if we do not choose, the choice will be made for us by those interested at home and aprod and weakening the power of the american electorate. it's not a brave announcement, but it is our country to govern, to defend and to enjoy as long as we choose to set our minds to it. thank you. [applause] >> i think we're going to have a few questi
in 1958, a botched cue in syria i think and 57. and eisenhower's own advisers quietly start telling him the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had
a broad swath of the opposition, broad enough that would have legitimacy with the opposition back in syria itself. but there are some attempts and people are thinking about these things-perhaps because of what happened in iraq in 2003. >> wonderful. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domes
priority than it was in the year past than the obvious higher priorities are of the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia and so forth. i would imagine it's a considerably lower. >> did the policy wax and wane with new administration's? >> it did. the most was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy as i said was determined to do something that the cuba problem. he was obsessed, humiliated that the day. lyndon johnson can after kennedy and his obsession with vietnam so he declined precipitously. subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made a very serious efforts to achieve a rapprochement with castro, quite the opposite of what kennedy was doing. so yes, cuba has waxed and waned and it's been a different kind of priority over these 50 years, so it is with american presidents. estimate on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets, did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime ever tried to assassinate a u.s
president, the syria president, the leader ofha ene hezbollah, and imt said, "not everybody is your friend." i' okay? the lure of facebook, and its sen trailty is great ntrality tos . when israeli soldiers were deployed to the west bank to capture militants suspected of planning attacks on israel, one soldier actually posted on facebook that on wednesday we clean up this particular town and the rest of the post told about the planned raid, as well as the soldier's unit. as a result, the defense forces had to call off the raid in the court-martial of a soldier. also, don't check your facebook page on the victim's computer and leave it open. so the guy makes off with all these diamonds in this woman's house. and it's so addictive that he can't leave the house to go to his car and uses smart phone. he goes on his facebook page and then doesn't close it. the west virginia police found him right away. number five is do not tweet how boring your new job is going to be. a 22-year-old woman gets offered a great job at cisco and she tweets cisco just offered me a job, now i have to get a steady pay
. to people in syria really deserve to have their entire homes destroyed in be put out on the street and wonder if they will be hit by sniper a sniper's bullet at any second? not one bit. so it's our job to clean up the mess. it's our job to straighten a place out. we are the first collectivities of protons, the protons that make you and me up 13.72 billion years old. they have been around for a long time. we are the first social project those protons have ever put together that have a conscience and they can look at these things and say this is not right. this is not just. this is not warm and compassionate and loving which means we are the first creatures capable of doing anything we can, the phrase it out green the soul singer gave me while he was driving me around memphis and showing me the local vatican which was elvis's mansion, anything you can conceive and believe you can achieve. well, it's true and it's our obligation to dream these things, to dream of a more just, kind and loving cosmos and to make it happen. if that is our job, if there were goda god, we are in. if there
in the middle east if you look at syria where the u.s. is at risk for being drawn into a serious conflict there, and weapons, there's obviously talk about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done? >> well, i would go back to the presidency strategy on this, and take a look at it. didn't say that we would only, we reject everything we have in the military, across our government into the asia pacific. and prioritize the asia-pacific but also talked about the enduring requirement for us to be present and any security role in the middle east as well. so, you know, we're talking about i think a near-term perspective on this. you know, we see a kaleidoscope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require i think u.s., obviously he was leadership and also will require certain level of military security overtime. and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our force structure. and what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. and i'm convi
on right now in syria, some saying we had to armed the rebels. but anyway let me, i have often said that over the years our diplomats are really the unsung heroes of the united states security. they should no longer be unsung. the attacks on our mission and benghazi's should tell congress to better recognize that her diplomat are critical to our nation's security and that we must do better to ensure they have security. it is time for us to acknowledge not just with our words but also with our deeds the importance and the danger some of america's finest public servants face abroad, with a over 80 -- at any given time. our diplomats are often in the same kind of harm's way as our military is. without the same kind of body armor and firepower to protect themselves. we here in congress have a role to play in giving them the resources, the respect and attention they deserve. i can't tell you how many times that i have traveled and i meet with and ambassador who is trying to juggle their budget. they're trying to figure out and so oftentimes they request, they want to figure out, if there
between instability and central africa and the global terrorist threat. but from afghanistan to syria to iran to north korea, we also must recognize the existence of demonstrate actors and regimes that directly threaten the united states and our allies. therefore, we must ensure that the our military is sufficiently resourced and national leaders prioritize our defense resources toward efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vital security interest. i look forward to learning more about the situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i thank you very much for taking the time to hold the hearing. it's a very important issue, as you can described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's largest humanitarian crisis i think too few people have heard of. and some estimate of the war going over the course of the last fifteen to twenty years. and nearly 5 million people have been killed. many more wounded, injured, raped. it's a place are a lot of people are
'll continue to take. as bill said, the board report takes a clear-eyed look at syria, systemic problems for which we take responsibility, and that we have already gun to fix. we are grateful for the recommendations from the team. we accept every one of them, all 29 recommendations. .. specific action items. will assign every single one to the response for the bureau if immediate implementation and several will be completed by the end of the calendar year. implementation of each and every recommendation will be underway by the time the next secretary of state takes office. there will be no higher priority for the department in the coming weeks and months. should we require more resources to execute them we will work closely with the congress ensure they are met. as i said secretary hillary clinton wants us to implement the findings and do no more. let me offer clear specifics. for measure 200 years the united states has relied on host nations to provide securities for embassies and consulates. today in the environment we have to take a new and harder look at the exaibility and of our hos
questions. all parties should recognize the need for unity in the coming year when events in iran, syria, afghanistan, north korea, and other locations may test american national security in extreme ways. i commend each of you, my senate colleagues, for the commitment that led you to stand for election in the united states senate to begin with. running for office is a difficult endeavor that is usually accompanied by great personal risk and cost. each one of you is capable of being a positive force for changing the tone of debate in our country. each one of you has a responsibility not only to act with integrity and represent your constituents but also to make informed and imaginative choice on which good governance for our country depends. i am optimistic about our country's future. i believe that both internal divisions and external threats can be overcome. the united states will continue to serve as the inspiration for people seeking peace, freedom, and economic prosperity. and the united states senate should and will be at the forefront of this advancement. may we seek each day from
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